effyfurrow:

nointerrruption:

I’M ACTUALLY A REALLY NICE PERSON IM JUST USED TO BEING WALKED ALL OVER AND DISRESPECTED SO SOMETIMES I COME OFF AS MEAN BUT I JUST CANT LET PEOPLE TAKE ADVANTAGE OF ME AND I HAD TO GROW UP REALLY FAST OK BUT I PROMISE I HAVE A GOOD HEART AND GOOD INTENTIONS AND I DONT WANT TO EVER HURT PEOPLE’S FEELINGS BUT SOMETIMES I JSUT HAVE TO HAVE THE UPPER HAND AND MAKE SURE I DONT GET HURT IM SORR YI LOVE EVERYONE

SOMEBODY FUCKING SAID IT 

(via urulokid)

1 hour ago 594,476 notes

"Anxiety is not rude. Depression is not selfish. Schizophrenia is not wrong. Eating disorders are not a choice. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is not crazy. Mental illness isn’t self-centred, anymore than cancer is self-centred. It’s a medical illness."

- (via bewilderedapprehension)

(via creatingpathstowander)

5 hours ago 123,375 notes

limnion:

[x]

8 hours ago 111,490 notes

heyteenbookshey:

That moment of anxiety when you are about to use a word you learned in books but have never said out loud and have no idea how to pronounce it oh god what if I say it wrong everyone will know I am a literate fool

(via creatingpathstowander)

12 hours ago 44,443 notes

originalplumbing:

"Everyone who has rallied to get me on this list I love you all. To have a black trans woman at the top of this list if it’s only for today is so major. Keep voting. Voting is open til April 22.” — Laverne Cox via Facebook

Click here to cast your vote in the TIME100 Reader Poll.

(via fandomshatewomen)

16 hours ago 10,791 notes

Steve’s favorite things about Sam

The way Sam actually cares about birds and people. Like other people try to downplay how much they care and genuinely hate letting others know they care. But not Sam. He doesn’t consider it a sign of weakness and lets others comments about it roll off him.

Sam always smells nice. And not just like he’s always clean and he smells like shampoo or even those offending modern axe things that are advertised.  Sam smells like coconut oil because he uses coconut oil for his hair.  So basically Sam smells like good things all the time. Even after he’s done flying through smelly, smoggy streets he’ll do a turn over the ocean and smell like saltwater and coconut oil. Other times he’ll tend to their rooftop garden and come back smelling like whatever is blooming.

Sam always has great music on. Sometimes he’s playing things he thinks Steve should listen to like Marvin Gaye but sometimes the iPod dies and he’ll be humming along. His voice humming or singing low, its rich and melodious and Steve watches him as he dances around the kitchen with a nearly imperceptible melody in his throat.

At some point Steve’s list (of all the things he loves about Sam) is found during a trip to the laundry. “What’s this? A shopping list?” Sam asks ready to toss it away.

"Its my list of favorite things about you." Steve admits shyly.

Sam’s smile definitely needs to be added. Also Sam’s lips.

16 hours ago 4 notes

(via wocinsolidarity)

18 hours ago 226 notes

anthrocentric:

A History of Slavery and Genocide Is Hidden in Modern DNA

There are plenty of ways to study history. You can conduct archaeological digs, examining the artifacts and structures buried under the ground to learn about past lifestyles. You can read historical texts, perusing the written record to better understand events that occurred long ago.

But an international group of medical researchers led by Andrés Moreno-Estrada and Carlos Bustamante of Stanford and Eden Martin of the University of Miami are looking instead at a decidedly unconventional historical record: human DNA.

Hidden in the microscopic genetic material of people from the Caribbean, they’ve found, is an indelible record of human history, stretching back centuries to the arrival of Europeans, the decimation of Native American populations and the trans-Atlantic slave trade. By analyzing these genetic samples and comparing them to the genes of people around the world, they’re able to pinpoint not only the geographic origin of various populations but even the timing of when great migrations occurred.

As part of a new project, documented in a study published yesterday in PLOS Genetics, the researchers sampled and studied the DNA of 251 people living in Florida who had ancestry from one of six countries and islands that border the Caribbean—Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Honduras and Colombia—along with 79 residents of Venezuela who belong to one of three Native American groups (the YukpaWarao and Bari tribes). Each study participant was part of a triad that included two parents and one of their children who were also surveyed, so the researchers could track which particular genetic markers were passed on from which parents.

The researchers sequenced the DNA of these participants, analyzing their entire genomes in search of particular genetic sequences—called single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)—that often differ between unrelated individuals and are passed down from parent to child. To provide context for the SNPs they found in people from these groups and areas, they compared them to existing databases of sequenced DNA from thousands of people globally, such as data from the HapMap Project.

[read more]

(via maliciastarling)

21 hours ago 1,367 notes